Sponsored By

Lighting with Canon’s 1DC DSLR 4K Capture Project “The Ticket”

As a new cinematographer, you learn from your mentors, experiment and find your style – your brush strokes, so to speak. I learned to replicate all aspects of light. Using natural light outside was possible, but the natural light inside a space during the day or night needed to be created. The natural light on streets at night always needed to be augmented to expose the film. We were constantly asking Kodak and Fuji for faster film stock, as well as asking lighting manufacturers to build bigger lights.

Now, we are at a wonderful crossroad, where we can do what we have done for decades or try a new way to light, a new way to create. Both roads are valid, but I do find pushing the limit and trying new things exciting. I find that any time I get comfortable, I need to challenge myself. On this film, the lighting was a challenge because we used natural, available light and shaped it. I turned lights off, then added accent lights to bring out the depth of a location.

The Hospital

The Hospital

At the Northridge Medical Center, we were able to use all the available lights that were in the ceiling, which were 4’ cool white flo’s. Po and I wanted to go for a very sterile, antiseptic feel. So I baked in the look with a Neutral picture style with the color temp set at 2700 degrees. This gave us the starting point with this cold, minty green feel. Po described the hallway as cold and representative of death because this is what Vince was expecting after the intense car accident. I loved that idea, but I said what if we make the rooms feel alive. So, I purposedly lit them with Kino Flo Tegra units and pushed warm white flos out of the rooms and into the hallways.

Lighting the actors in the hallway was done with a single 4’ Kino Flo Tegra, which I absolutely love. It dims down perfectly and gives you that ability to adjust without gels, which saves time and money. In front of this light was a 4 x 4 Rosco 1/2 tough white diffusion frame, and for close ups, Rosco full white diffusion. On the lens for Emma’s coverage, I used digital diffusion to help smooth the skin and help with this 4K capture. The result was a beautiful light that glowed in Emma’s eyes when Vince hugs her for the first time. We were able to shoot the whole scene at 400 ISO because there was plenty of light. It gave us a very clean look at this location.

4’ Kino Flo Tegra

4’ Kino Flo Tegra

4’ Kino Flo Tegra lighting through a 4 X 4 Rosco 1/2 Tough White Diffusion

4’ Kino Flo Tegra lighting through a 4 X 4 Rosco 1/2 Tough White Diffusion

Emma’s close up

Emma’s close up


The Exit

The Exit

When Vince and Emma exit, I wanted to use color contrast to help tell the story of them leaving that cold world and moving into the warm light. We did not want to inject a lot of color, just cool and warm so when they hit the streets that multi-color feel would be that much more powerful visually. We used the existing flo’s in the ceiling to light them as they came around the corner and headed out the door. They were immediately basked in two Kino Flo Celeb 200 LED lights that we rigged on a speedrail goal post just out of frame. The rest of the warm light was existing from can lights built into the ER overhang.

Kino Flo Celeb 200

Kino Flo Celeb 200

The Taxi

The Taxi

Shooting in cars at night is always difficult, but in this scene, I wanted to use the 1DC’s sensitive sensor to bring the outside light in. A perfect example of this was on Crazy Beautiful, which had a scene where Kirsten Dunst picked up Jay Hernandez in their Bronco, but without a top and driving around the streets of LA. I had to put the Bronco up on a process trailer and pull this with a camera car and a generator. I created this pulley system to have overhead light sources like the street lights that they would drive under. I pushed the film stock one stop to try and bring up the ambient light that existed. This was a massive lighting gag that looked very cool but not as real as what I was able to do on the Ticket, which was inside an enclosed Prius. Using one single Rosco light panel, I was able to shoot at a 1.3 on the Canon 24mm cinema prime. Driving on Sunset Blvd gave us the natural light to expose inside the car. You need to check out these light panels. They are amazing, so soft and tungsten or daylight balanced. All on battery and use hardly any power.
Rosco Litepad Kit

Rosco Litepad Kit

Rosco Litepad Kit

 The Taxi Pull Up

The Taxi Cab Pull Up

Po’s vision was for the camera to slide from our Cab Driver, who is giving Vince advice to get out because it will be faster. This image was one of those movie poster moments. You look through the lens, and you know this is it. So we catch the Cabbie, and he is bathed in red/orange light from the brake lights of the cars in front of them in this traffic jam. I achieved this look by setting up 3 Celeb 200 with Rosco medium red color on them. This infused this wonderful soft light into the car and all the way to Emma and Vince in the back seat. Derek Johnson was on a 650 watt Fresnel that wiped across Vincent when he checks his watch. This was to wash the interior with white light to color contrast against the red. The blue light was my plan to shift Emma’s focus from that stare out of the window to her looking in the direction of the moving blue light that is the Boutique. You can see that reflection in the bottom of the frame in her close up. I loved the way the multi color collage looked and felt.

Cabbie and Vince being lit by 650 watt Fresnel Lighting Gag

Cabbie and Vince being lit by 650 watt Fresnel Lighting Gag

Cabbie and Vince being lit by Kino Flo Celeb 200’s

Cabbie and Vince being lit by Kino Flo Celeb 200’s

Using 3 Kino Flo Celeb 300s in front of the Taxi

Using 3 Kino Flo Celeb 300s in front of the Taxi

 Jo Leko

The Store Front Window

One of my favorite shots was when Emma exits the car. She looks so beautiful, the moving blue light playing on her face. She looks like a little kid in a candy shot. I wanted to light this section with an urban feel. I embraced the orange sodium vapor lights on Sunset Blvd. and flagged a couple off of her so that the light came from one direction and that was from the right side as a back light. Lumisys Systems supplied the 400 watt High Pressure Sodium that we put on a Mambo combo. Then, I used 3-200 Celeb’s at 5000 degrees on a goal post above the window to create cool soft light that felt like it was emanating from the window so that the spinning pattern contrast wasn’t so stark. I felt that the side angle shot looked very cool with the light falling off on Vince until he walks into the pool of light that comes from the window. The Canon 50mm Cinema Prime did an amazing job bringing the out of focus lights in the background forward.

 

Left: 400 watt High pressure sodium on mambo combo  Right: Vince and Emma backlit by the 400 watt High Pressure Sodium

Left: 400 watt High pressure sodium on mambo combo Right: Vince and Emma backlit by the 400 watt High Pressure Sodium

Kino Flo 200 Celebs on the goal post

Kino Flo 200 Celebs on the goal post

Vince’s Close up

Vince’s Close up


You can view “The Ticket” on a previous post.
Like “The Ticket” on Facebook
.
Rate “The Ticket” on IMDB.

Author: Shane

Share This Post On

51 Comments

  1. Wow, thanks for sharing all this great stuff on lighting. I think this short is some of your best work.

    Post a Reply
    • Dave Dugdale, it is my pleasure. It what I love and what I do, holding stuff close to the chest is over.

      Post a Reply
  2. Oh, sorry I missed you at NAB, I was looking forward to meeting you somewhere on the show floor, perhaps next year.

    Post a Reply
  3. Wow! Thanks, again, for all you do! This is very educational :)

    Post a Reply
    • Eric Diosay, thank you so much my friend. It was great hang in’ with you in Vegas. More to come

      Post a Reply
  4. Shane,

    Really cool stuff, super educational, it’s really cool that you constantly put these blog posts up. The one thing I was really impressed with was the little Rosco litepads. I thought they really blended well into a scene and are easy to hide. The light throw seemed just enought to bump up the light in the cab but not so much to ruin the gorgeous nightscapes of LA. Its also amazing that there are now DSLRs that shoot 4k.

    Thanks,
    Don

    Post a Reply
    • Don Hankins, thank you so much for your kind words. Those Rosco panels blew me away as well. I have the whole kit and it is a must buy. Period.

      Post a Reply
      • Shane, thanks for this unique and valuable making of. I also used a Rosco Litepad in december while filming in a car. The light is a little colder than daylight (and a little green, but we used an early version with CRI 80, should be better now). How did you balance the color temperature of the LitePad (6000 K) with the lights outside (3200 K)? Did you gel the Rosco to match?

        If anyone might be interested: here’s the link to the Internet Opera ‘Soul Seek’. Part 1 (named ‘TWO’) contains the limo-scene lit with the Rosco LitePad. http://www.slsk.nl

        Post a Reply
    • N.K.Osborne, you are very welcome and thank you for your support.

      Post a Reply
    • Keith Lanpher, thank you so much for your kind words. IT was a 4 day shoot.

      Post a Reply
  5. Nice blog – thanks for sharing the details – really loved the look of the short.

    Lance

    Post a Reply
    • Lance Bachelder, thank you so much for those kind words of support.

      Post a Reply
  6. Fantastic post, thanks for sharing. You did a very fine lighting job on The Ticket, looks great.

    Post a Reply
    • Raul Canas, thank you so much, really appreciate that. Love the support

      Post a Reply
    • Philippe Kiener, thank you so much for your support and kind words.

      Post a Reply
  7. Any chance you will upload the 4k version to youtube in 4k? or maybe some 4k stills?

    Post a Reply
    • Kevin, I would love to if youtube was 4K, they barely do 720p. Best thing is to get out at these events that Canon has been planning and see it.

      Post a Reply
  8. Thanks for another amazing post.

    Post a Reply
    • Matheus, you are so welcome, thank you for your support

      Post a Reply
  9. Thanks you so much for this post, Shane. It’s always wonderful to see how you’re willing to share your knowledge and insight into lighting. Although I believe is clearly overcharging for this camera, I’m still blown away with what you managed to achieve with it…

    Post a Reply
    • Richard, you are very welcome, thank you for your support. I answered James B, on why this camera is so special.

      Post a Reply
  10. “400 watt High pressure sodium on mambo combo” – awesome to get BTS lighting info this detailed

    Post a Reply
    • JH, thank you so much for your kind words of support.

      Post a Reply
  11. Incredible attention to detail Shane. When you mention moments like ‘Derek Johnson was on a 650 watt Fresnel that wiped across Vincent when he checks his watch’ – It makes me realise that EVERYTHING has been considered and thought about for a specific reason. One forgets that there really is no such thing as an accident when it comes to what the viewer sees in a shot. All these little details add up to produce something that feels extremely well considered and controlled. It’s fascinating to hear the ‘why’ behind the decisions you made. Thanks for sharing.

    Post a Reply
    • Oli Kember, great hearing from you my friend. Yes, nothing is left to chance, well yes there are those serendipity moments and I will describe one. I was up in the Ferris Wheel shooting that sequence. The wind started to kick up. Emma looks to Vince and her hair blows and she say”I’ve been waiting for this moment.” Her eyes start to tear up from the wind and the cold, when he asks her “Will you marry me.” The look with the hair blowing, and the eyes tearing. WOW we got it.

      Post a Reply
      • Hi Shane,
        Thanks for that story – It sounds like one of those special moments where everyone looks at each other and you all know that you’ve nailed it. Those can be truly magical.
        Oli.

        Post a Reply
  12. nice job of mixing up the angles in the hallway (and everywhere really).. Usually these web test vids fall flat, but I’d watch that again.

    Post a Reply
    • Chace Strickland, thank you so much for your kind words. I think Po rocked it out.

      Post a Reply
  13. I was at your presentation at NAB, the shot of Emma through the cab was the “Wow” moment for the audience. I was sitting with a group that actually were freaking at that shot, I thought it was a happy accident, but now I see how much time you spent to get the reds and blues into that shot from different angles. Did you use the Celebs at 5500 when they beg the ferris wheel operator?

    Post a Reply
    • I used Kino Flo 4 bank tetras with daylight tubes for that scene. Glad you guys enjoyed the presentation, and thanks for your words of support.

      Post a Reply
  14. Thanks for amazing short Mr. Hurblut.. But there is no HD version here.. Why?? :))

    Post a Reply
  15. Thanks for the details Shane. Love the looks you created for this piece. I was wondering if you have tried LEE gels Urban filters as a possible substitute for an actual sodium fixture? Caught your discussion at the Tiffen booth as well, great stuff.

    Post a Reply
    • Thanks so much Craigc, the urban filters are way too warm compared to the sodium vapor street lamps that exists. It’s no substitute for the real thing, thats the reason I built 40 of these metal halide,mercury vapor, and sodium vapor lights. You can rent them at Luminys systems http://www.luminyscorp.com/. Thanks for the support and comment.

      Post a Reply
  16. Thanks for sharing your knowledge and this great behind the scenes Shane! It feels like we are also on the set and it is very inspiring for me as a wanabe cinematographer! Keep up the great work!

    Post a Reply
    • Thank you so much for your wonderful words and your support.

      Post a Reply
  17. hello i just have a quick question about the taxi cab pull up:
    what id you didnt add the Rosco medium red color, and just add more whitebalance to make it look warm, won’t that give the same result?

    Post a Reply
    • Ben, no because by doing that all the other colors in your spectrum will be influenced. I wanted the store front reflection to feel cool, almost hyper white, If I went up to 5500 or 6000 to try and get more warmth then the store front would have looked white, probably warm and your color contrast is gone. The beauty of this shot is the red taillight, mixed with the warm practicals across the street, with the warm sodium vapor street lamps, mixed with the cool store front reflection, along with the blue light spinning on her face. This is done with lighting, not color temp.

      Post a Reply
  18. Shane you are awesome. Thanks for sharing your techniques and being a mentor to so many through your site and blog. Is there somewhere we can post pictures and questions about our own projects? Thanks again mate for giving back to the cinematography/film community.

    Ad Astra,
    Iain Trimble

    Post a Reply
    • Iain Trimble, this is an amazing idea. I will reach out to my web team to see if we can make this happen. Thank you for your kind words and support

      Post a Reply
  19. Shane thanks for share your knowlegde with us,it a honor to know lighting and cinematography from you.

    Post a Reply
    • Carlos Diaz, thank you for those kind words and thank you for supporting our blog

      Post a Reply
  20. such a wonderful information for independent filmmakers, just loved it. RESPECT sir . one more thing i have become a huge fan of need for speed movie, such an awesome DOP work. hats off really !! the visuals were so natural .

    Post a Reply

Submit a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>